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( Hachiman ) 38 found.
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Koanken Temple
Koanken Temple was built in 1350 by Takayasu Togashi, and was dedicated to Sotetsu Meiho, the fourth chief priest of Daijoji Temple. In 1915, during cultivation of the land said to be the burial mount of the founder of Daijoji Temple, Gikai Tettsu, ...
Nagaike
The Kaganokuni Ishikawagun Sonshi (History of Villages in Ishikawa County, Kaga Province) describes the origin of Nagaike Village's name. It describes the village as being long from north to south, with more dwellings seen in the south, on land that ...
Sumiyoshi-no-miya
Sumiyoshi-no-miya (Nunoichi Shrine) was originally named Togashi-go Hachiman Shrine, which protected the area of present-day Hon-machi 2 and 3-chome. In 1914, Shojitsu Hachiman Shrine, which protected the area of present-day Hon-machi 4-chome, and So...
Rain Prayer Stone
This stone was originally at Shojitsu Hachiman Shrine. During the Edo Period (1603-1868), the area suffered a water shortage due to dry weather; but when people carried this stone and walked around the town, it started raining. It was named the rain ...
Mikkaichi
The name, Mikkaichi (Market on dates that include 3), came from markets held on the 3rd, 13th, and 23rd of each month during the Middle Ages. The market declined in the late 16th century, but it is thought that the farmers living in this area later f...
Futsukaichi
The name, Futsukaichi (Market on dates with the number 2 in them), came from a market held on the 2nd, 12th, and 22nd of each month around the 14th century. It was located near Yokoe-no-sho, a manor that belonged to Tenryuji Temple in Kyoto, and flou...
Kosho Hachiman Shrine
Kosho Hachiman Shrine was named in 1871 with a sacred object and main shrine located at Kanaya Palace (currently Oyama Shrine). These were granted to Tokumoto Town by feudal lord Nariyasu Maeda. It is surprising that the feudal lord would have grante...
Cultural Properties at Kosho Hachiman Shrine
Kosho Hachiman Shrine houses documents that explain the process of giving Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace to Tokumoto Village in 1871, historical documents related to Hachiman Shrine, and documents and drawings by Nariyasu Maeda. Among those documen...
Kanaya Goten Goyokata Akai Kinai Yamazaki Kafukuo Oboe
Jikichi Kenbe of Tokumoto Village received these documents at Kanaya Palace in August of 1871. The memorandum describes the decision to give the sacred object from Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace to Tokumoto Village and other matters.
Moto-tomura-yaku Seo Magozo Tedai Kenbe Jikichi Ukesho
Jikichi Kenbe of Tokumoto Village received these documents at Kanaya Palace in August of 1871. The memorandum describes the decision to give the sacred object from Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace to Tokumoto Village and other matters.
Kenbe Jikichi Tsuchijo
Jikichi Kenbe of Tokumoto Village received these documents at Kanaya Palace in August of 1871. The memorandum describes the decision to give the sacred object from Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace to Tokumoto Village and other matters.
Kosyozan Hachimangu
Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace enshrined the spirit of the deity of Ana-hachiman Shrine (Shinjuku, Tokyo), which was quite well known during the Edo Period (1603-1868). It is possible that Toshitsune Maeda, the 3rd feudal lord of Kaga Domain, wante...
Hachiman Okami no Shingogaku
The framed name of the Hachiman God was displayed at Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace. On the back of the frame, there is the engraved description of being written by Nariyasu Maeda in 1870. On the box in which this frame was stored, it is written th...
Hachiman Okami no Shingojiku
The framed name of the Hachiman God was displayed at Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace. On the back of the frame, there is the engraved description of being written by Nariyasu Maeda in 1870. On the box in which this frame was stored, it is written th...
Kame no Ji
Kame no Ji was drawn by Nariyasu Maeda when he was 5 years old, and Saru no E was drawn by him when he was 7 years old. Takara no Tama no Zu was drawn by him in 1877. The back of the top of the box shows that this was housed at Kosho Hachiman Shrine....
Takara no Tama no Zu
Kame no Ji was drawn by Nariyasu Maeda when he was 5 years old, and Saru no E was drawn by him when he was 7 years old. Takara no Tama no Zu was drawn by him in 1877. The back of the top of the box shows that this was housed at Kosho Hachiman Shrine....
Saru no E
Kame no Ji was drawn by Nariyasu Maeda when he was 5 years old, and Saru no E was drawn by him when he was 7 years old. Takara no Tama no Zu was drawn by him in 1877. The back of the top of the box shows that this was housed at Kosho Hachiman Shrine....
Ogimen
Kame no Ji was drawn by Nariyasu Maeda when he was 5 years old, and Saru no E was drawn by him when he was 7 years old. Takara no Tama no Zu was drawn by him in 1877. The back of the top of the box shows that this was housed at Kosho Hachiman Shrine....
Yaso Yuka Ono-ono Onozukara Kobashi
Kame no Ji was drawn by Nariyasu Maeda when he was 5 years old, and Saru no E was drawn by him when he was 7 years old. Takara no Tama no Zu was drawn by him in 1877. The back of the top of the box shows that this was housed at Kosho Hachiman Shrine....
Tori-I
The Tomuro stone gate was moved to Tokumoto Village at the same time Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace was moved. It is partially broken. "September 1863" is engraved on one of the gate's pillars. The other pillar shows that Tomoko, wife of ...
Sanja no Dai Gaku
The Tomuro stone gate was moved to Tokumoto Village at the same time Hachiman Shrine at Kanaya Palace was moved. It is partially broken. "September 1863" is engraved on one of the gate's pillars. The other pillar shows that Tomoko, wife of ...
A Pair of Wooden Shrine Guardian Dogs
This is a pair of wooden shrine guardian dogs placed at the worship hall of Kosho Hachiman Shrine. The sculptor is unknown. They are thought to have been made at the end of the 16th century.
Horiuchi
The area name, Horiuchi, appeared in the Tenbun Nikki (Tenbun Diary) written by Shonyo, the 10th chief abbot of the Honganji Temple, in the 16th century. Landholders' residences were often surrounded by moats at that time. Horiuchi means "within...
Toheida
The area name, Toheida, first appeared in Tenbun Nikki, or diary of Shonyo, the 10th chief priest of Shinshu Sect Honganji Temple. The diary explains that Jonen Toheida, an influential leader during the Ikko Ikki (uprising of Ikko Sect followers), li...
Kiyokane
The name of Kiyokane Village appeared in a letter to a vassal written by the feudal lord Toshiie Maeda in 1599. This area was known for its watermelon production in the Showa Period (1926-1989). The legend of the God of Stone has been passed down in...
Fujihira
Fujihira Village was built in the Early Modern Period. There are records showing 5 farmers in 1670, 9 households and 48 residents in 1876. Fujihira became a part of Nonoichi Town in 1955. Kinkyo Hachiman Shrine in this area is thought to have been b...
Suematsu
The village name, Suematsu, appeared in the 1646 Shoho Gocho (Shoho Tax Register). There are records in another historical document showing 24 farmers in 1670, and 194 farmers in 1876. Suematsu became a part of Tomioku Village in 1889. At the beginn...
Suematsu Burial Mound
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level) in the alluvial fan of the Tedori River. Due to t...
Former Site of Hofukuji Temple
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level) in the alluvial fan of the Tedori River. Due to t...
Former Site of Odachi Yakata
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level) in the alluvial fan of the Tedori River. Due to t...
Former Site of Kogendo Yakata
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level) in the alluvial fan of the Tedori River. Due to t...
Former Site of Suematsu Shinano Yakata
Many sites were discovered in Suematsu. The biggest discovery was the former site of Suematsu Temple, a large temple in ancient times. This area is located at a high elevation (35-40m above sea level) in the alluvial fan of the Tedori River. Due to t...
Todoroki
Todoroki was located in the area now known as Suematsu 2-chome. A story told in the area is that foxes and raccoons used to cheat people at nighttime. Long ago, Hachiman Shrine was located in the southeast, and Ebisu Shrine was located in the west. ...
Hayashigo Hachiman Shrine
Hayashigo Hachiman Shrine is thought to have been established in 1013. People in the area put great faith in it as the main shrine of Hayashi Go; and the head of the Hayashi clan and Genyu Okuwa (jito) worshipped the guardian god enshrined there. It ...
A Large Chinquapin Tree in Kambayashi
This large chinquapin tree has been worshipped at Hayashigo Hachiman Shrine since ancient times. According to a 1988 survey, this tree is the second largest in Japan. There is also a legend associated with the tree. "Long ago, there was an old ...
Former Site of the Hayashi Clan Residence in Kambayashi
The former site of a Hayashi Clan residence is thought to have been located in Kambayashi. A small shrine currently marks the spot. It is said that there were some area names related to horses and the residence in the past. Area names located to the ...
Shinjo
In 1345, Takauji Ashikaga, founder of the Ashikaga Shogunate, assigned Ujiharu Togashi as Jito, (medieval land steward) to the area. This area was called Togashi Shinjo at that time. The current area name, Shinjo, is thought to have come from this ol...
Yahagi
The area name, Yahagi, comes from the fact the many residents were engaged in arrow making. Yahagi in Japanese means to make arrows. In 1486, when the priest Doko climbed down Mt. Hakusan and stayed overnight in Yahagi, he composed a tanka, a Japanes...