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( Togashi ) 24 found.
  Title
Koanken Temple
Koanken Temple was built in 1350 by Takayasu Togashi, and was dedicated to Sotetsu Meiho, the fourth chief priest of Daijoji Temple. In 1915, during cultivation of the land said to be the burial mount of the founder of Daijoji Temple, Gikai Tettsu, ...
Daijoji Temple Sites
Daijoji Temple was originally built by Iehisa Togashi in Oshinosho as an esoteric Buddhist temple, meant to be headed by the monk Chokai. Later, Iehisa and Chokai invited Gikai Tettsu from Eiheiji Temple to head Daijoji Temple, and in 1293 Daijoji Te...
Goto Family Residence
The Gotoke Monjo, a collection of approximately 1,800 historical documents passed down by the Goto Clan of Oshino Village, has been designated a cultural property by Ishikawa Prefecture. The Goto Clan was founded by Munetoshi Togashi, the third son o...
Oshino Tachinaka & Oshino Yakata Sites
The Oshino Tachinaka and Oshino Yakata sites are located to the southeast of Tateno Elementary School. The Oshino Tachinaka sites are from a settlement existing between the late-middle and late-late Yayoi Period (100 BC-300 AD). Oshino Yakata was ...
Nonoichi City Furusato History Museum
Contact: Nonoichi City Furusato History Museum TEL: 076-246-0133 Closed: Mondays (Tuesday when Monday is a national holiday), the day after national holidays (excluding Saturdays and Sundays), Year-end and New Year holidays Open Hour: 10:00AM - ...
Horses (drawn by Masachika Togashi)
Based on the writing on the top left, the painting of three horses is thought to have been done by Masachika Togashi in 1485. However, some say it was done by Yasutaka Togashi, a granduncle of Masachika Togashi. According to the book Tohaku Gasetsu, ...
Statue of Iekuni Togashi
The Togashi Clan had its base around the middle basin of the Takahashi River. It is said that the residence of the head of the clan was established in Nonoichi in 1063. In 1988, a bronze statue of Iekuni Togashi and a monument to the history of the c...
Ougigaoka Yagurada Sites
The Ougigaoka Yagurada Sites date from the middle of 12th to the early 13th century. Sites of 25 homes with posts dug into the ground were found. They are thought to have been built over a short period of time. The largest known building from the e...
Ougigaoka Hawaigoku Sites
The Ougigaoka Yagurada Sites date from the middle of 12th to the early 13th century. Sites of 25 homes with posts dug into the ground were found. They are thought to have been built over a short period of time. The largest known building from the e...
Ougigaoka Gosho Sites
The Ougigaoka Yagurada Sites date from the middle of 12th to the early 13th century. Sites of 25 homes with posts dug into the ground were found. They are thought to have been built over a short period of time. The largest known building from the e...
Former Site of the Shuri Matsukawa Residence
The former site of the residence of Shuri Matsukawa, a vassal who served Masachika Togashi.
Former Site of the Yamago Mikawanokami Residence
It is thought that present-day Yamago Town in Kanazawa City was the location of the base for the Yamago Clan, an offshoot from the Togashi Clan. The owner of the residence was Takafuji Yamago who served Masachika Togashi. Takafuji Yamago appeared in ...
Stone Monument at the Former Site of the Togashi Residence
The Togashi Residence was home to the head of the Togashi Clan over the generations. The surrounding area was the center of politics and economy for the Kaga Region at that time. The precise location of the residence had been unknown for a long perio...
Former Site of the Togashi Residence
The Togashi Clan had its base around the middle basin of the Takahashi River in present-day Nonoichi City. It is said that the Togashi Clan established the residence in Nonoichi in 1063. After the Jokyu War in 1221, the Togashi Clan became the leader...
Sumiyoshi-no-miya
Sumiyoshi-no-miya (Nunoichi Shrine) was originally named Togashi-go Hachiman Shrine, which protected the area of present-day Hon-machi 2 and 3-chome. In 1914, Shojitsu Hachiman Shrine, which protected the area of present-day Hon-machi 4-chome, and So...
Monument to Togashi Clan
Located on the right side of Nunoichi Shrine gate, this monument was built in 1889 by Iyomon Mimo, a leading farmer in Nonoichi Village. Over 500 years of Togashi Clan history are inscribed on the stone, from founder Tadayori to Masachika, who commit...
Rain Prayer Stone
This stone was originally at Shojitsu Hachiman Shrine. During the Edo Period (1603-1868), the area suffered a water shortage due to dry weather; but when people carried this stone and walked around the town, it started raining. It was named the rain ...
Former Nonoichi Area
The name Nonoichi first appeared in the Sannomiya Koki, which was written in 1312 and housed at Shirayama Hime Shrine. Governor (shugo) Togashi used this area as a base to control Kaga Province. The reason is because Nonoichi was located at an import...
Former Site of the Gorobe Takatsuka Residence
Futsukaichi is home to a legend about a white fox and Gorobe, a vassal serving Masachika Togashi. The legend tells of a white fox in Nonoichi. This fox often cheated people, so Masachika asked Gorobe to kill it. Gorobe received land in Futsukaichi as...
Hayashigo Hachiman Shrine
Hayashigo Hachiman Shrine is thought to have been established in 1013. People in the area put great faith in it as the main shrine of Hayashi Go; and the head of the Hayashi clan and Genyu Okuwa (jito) worshipped the guardian god enshrined there. It ...
Shinjo
In 1345, Takauji Ashikaga, founder of the Ashikaga Shogunate, assigned Ujiharu Togashi as Jito, (medieval land steward) to the area. This area was called Togashi Shinjo at that time. The current area name, Shinjo, is thought to have come from this ol...
Shinjo
In 1345, Takauji Ashikaga, founder of Ashikaga Shogunate, assigned Ujiharu Togashi as Jito, (medieval land steward) to the area. The current area name, Shinjo, is thought to have come from this old name. It was merged into Nonoichi Town in 1955. Thi...
Yahagi
The area name, Yahagi, comes from the fact the many residents were engaged in arrow making. Yahagi in Japanese means to make arrows. In 1486, when the priest Doko climbed down Mt. Hakusan and stayed overnight in Yahagi, he composed a tanka, a Japanes...
Former Site of the Bando Fujioka Residence
This is the former site of Bando Fujioka's residence. Bando Fujioka was a vassal of Togashi Clan who died in the battle of Tako Castle in 1488. Until the 19th century, clay walls and the trace of moats remained in the area.